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Plastic Ocean: How a Sea Captain’s Chance Discovery Launched a Determined Quest to Save the Oceans

A prominent seafaring environmentalist and researcher shares his shocking discovery of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, and inspires a fundamental rethinking of the Plastic Age.

In the summer of 1997, Charles Moore set sail from Honolulu returning home after competing in a trans-Pacific race. To get to California, he and his crew took a shortcut through the seldom-traversed North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, a vast “oceanic desert” where winds are slack and sailing ships languish. There, Moore realized his catamaran was surrounded by a “plastic soup.”  He had stumbled upon the largest garbage dump on the planet—a spiral nebula where plastic outweighed zooplankton, the ocean’s food base, by a factor of six to one.

In Plastic Ocean, Moore recounts his ominous findings and unveils the secret life and hidden proper ties of plastics. From milk jugs to polymer molecules small enough  to penetrate human skin or be unknowingly inhaled, plastic is now suspected  of contributing to a host of ailments, including  infertility, autism, thyroid  dysfunction, and some cancers. An urgent call to action, Moore’s sobering revelations will be embraced by activists, concerned  parents, and anyone concerned about the deadly impact and implications of this man-made blight.

Reblogged 6 years ago from www.amazon.com

Comments

HollyHolly says:

Shocking Revelation! “Plastic Ocean” is a must read! The story of Captain Charles Moore, Citizen Scientist, who stumbled upon modern civilization’s dirty little secret. The North Pacific Gyre holds tons of end user waste plastic which doesn’t degrade and is not inert or benign as we have been lead to believe. The book takes the reader on a journey — of ocean voyage, of scientific discovery, and as detective. Well written, the story moves along at a great clip, never getting bogged down while interweaving detailed…

yossi shirazi says:

The Other Side of Plastic I received this as a gift and presumed 300 pages of dolphin tears penned by a bleeding heart and totally out of touch author. However, I was pleasantly surprised that this was NOT the case. The author and his team set out to describe the “dark side of plastic, how it’s escaped from civilization and colonized the mid-ocean.” They engage in a ‘gonzo’ yet perfectly legit science to collect data that ends up fascinating the world. The author is passionate about his field but usually retains a…

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