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Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People We Don’t Know

Malcolm Gladwell, host of the podcast Revisionist History and author of the #1 New York Times bestseller Outliers, offers a powerful examination of our interactions with strangers–and why they often go wrong.
How did Fidel Castro fool the CIA for a generation? Why did Neville Chamberlain think he could trust Adolf Hitler? Why are campus sexual assaults on the rise? Do television sitcoms teach us something about the way we relate to each other that isn’t true?
Talking to Strangers is a classically Gladwellian intellectual adventure, a challenging and controversial excursion through history, psychology, and scandals taken straight from the news. He revisits the deceptions of Bernie Madoff, the trial of Amanda Knox, the suicide of Sylvia Plath, the Jerry Sandusky pedophilia scandal at Penn State University, and the death of Sandra Bland—throwing our understanding of these and other stories into doubt. Something is very wrong, Gladwell argues, with the tools and strategies we use to make sense of people we don’t know. And because we don’t know how to talk to strangers, we are inviting conflict and misunderstanding in ways that have a profound effect on our lives and our world. In his first book since his #1 bestseller, David and Goliath, Malcolm Gladwell has written a gripping guidebook for troubled times.

Reblogged 2 months ago from www.amazon.com

Comments

Anonymous says:

“We think we can easily see into the hearts of others based on the flimsiest of clues.” Malcolm Gladwell is a gifted writer who engages our minds and emotions in his works of non-fiction. In “Talking to Strangers,” he tells us true stories that, at first, seem to be unrelated. A police stop ends in tragedy; Neville Chamberlain and other political figures famously misconstrued Hitler’s bellicose intentions; experienced judges grant bail to defendants who, they realize too late, should have remained in jail; the sociopath, Bernie Madoff, conducted a fraudulent investment scheme…

Anonymous says:

Sadly, Gladwell places his foot in his mouth… Wow, does this book ever suffer from a severe case of foot-in-mouth disease!I almost didn’t make it past the introduction. In my pre-publication copy, Gladwell writes, “The Sandra Bland case came in the middle of a strange interlude in American public life” and then goes on to discuss a series of cases of police violence against black people that happened around 2014.“Strange interlude.” Really?That phrasing suggests that this treatment was some sort of…

Anonymous says:

Doesn’t deliver. As one reviewer mentioned, the Interlude and the section on Brock Turner are absolutely cringeworthy for a host of reasons. I too almost stopped reading before the I got to the first chapter, and now I’m sort of disappointed that I read all the way to the end. Fascinating facts are revealed in typical Gladwell fashion which keeps the pace moving. But he comes terribly short on providing any sort of value for actually talking to strangers. Gladwell basically says, “Hey! We suck at talking to…

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