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Gogoro’s Eeyo 1 E-Bike is an Agile Commuter

With a lightweight carbon fiber frame that features a no-seat-tube design, Gogoro’s Eeyo 1 e-bike merges commuter utility with a ride-focused feel and the convenience of pedal assist. Weighing just 27 pounds, it is on the lighter end, with its 250W motor and 123Wh battery all bundled into the rear hub. Top speed is 20MPH with a range between 40 and 55 miles.

Reblogged 4 hours ago from www.werd.com

The shape of future data privacy regulation is immaterial

30-second summary:

  • New regulations will continue to emerge, but rather than scrambling to maintain compliance with each one individually, businesses need to establish a robust data supply chain on which to build governance so that they comply with local regulations.
  • Transparency is the letter of the law in all data regulations, so the first step for any business is to understand its own data practices and ensure they are fully disclosed.
  • Businesses that manage to communicate their data practices simply, without legal jargon, will gain consumer trust and a reputation for transparency that can be used as a competitive differentiator.
  • The consent process can be a vital first touch-point in the user journey and an opportunity to explain the role the consumer’s data plays in improving their own experience.
  • The latest entrant to the data management market is the Customer Data Platform (CDP). They can be used effectively alongside both CRM systems and DMPs, meaning businesses don’t need to completely replace their tech stack.

Data regulations are being strengthened across the APAC region, driven by privacy concerns held by more than two-thirds of consumers.

From Japan’s Act on the Protection of Personal Information (APPI) to Singapore’s Personal Data Protection Commission (PDPC), to Thailand’s Personal Data Protection Act and India’s Personal Data Protection Bill, new data laws are coming into force and existing regulations are being updated.

These changes, alongside regulatory shifts in the rest of the world, inevitably promote speculation around how the data privacy landscape will evolve and what’s likely to happen next.

But in truth, the shape of future privacy regulation is immaterial.

New regulations will continue to emerge, but rather than scrambling to maintain compliance with each one individually, businesses need to establish a robust data supply chain on which to build governance so that they comply with local regulations.

They must re-prioritize their data practices around transparency, communication and trust to satisfy consumer demand for increased control over personal data – whether they are compelled to by law, or not.

Full disclosure of data practices

Transparency is the letter of the law in all data regulations, so the first step for any business is to understand its own data practices and ensure they are fully disclosed.

As a result of poorly integrated systems and disparate data silos, many businesses struggle with fragmentation and a lack of visibility into the data they collect as well as what happens to it.

They are also battling with the vast volumes of data continually being produced across multiple channels, with over a third of marketers in APAC citing difficulties in unifying different sources of data, a situation that will only be exacerbated by the roll-out of 5G connectivity across the region.

Businesses need to create a data map that clearly shows all data sources, the information that is collected, where it is stored, what it is used for, and where it goes.

At this point most companies will want to rationalize their data practices, maintaining only those that are deemed essential.

Once businesses understand how data flows through the organisation and who it is shared with, this will need to be explained to consumers using clear, concise privacy policies.

Businesses that manage to communicate their data practices simply, without legal jargon, will gain consumer trust and a reputation for transparency that can be used as a competitive differentiator.

Enhanced consumer controls on data privacy

In addition to effectively communicating data practices, businesses must also give consumers more control over what happens to their personal data.

This means putting mechanisms in place that allow consumers to access the data stored about them, to have it amended when it is inaccurate or incomplete, to request that it is deleted entirely, or to take it to another provider.

It also means giving consumers more of a say in whether their data is collected in the first place.

Some regulations require consumers to positively opt in to the collection of data for activities such as marketing, while others only compel businesses to provide a means of opting out, but gaining explicit consent is arguably the most effective way to engage consumers and gain their trust, and is likely to become a required practice in more data regulations.

The consent process can be a vital first touch-point in the user journey and an opportunity to explain the role the consumer’s data plays in improving their own experience.

Once a user has set their consent preferences via this initial interaction these must be stored centrally, applied uniformly across the entire business and managed throughout the lifetime of that individual’s data supply chain.

Robust data management tools

To assist with both understanding data flows and giving consumers more control, businesses are exploring a range of data platforms.

However, there is a great deal of confusion around the different tools available and the role they play in data management, not least because they are all known by similar three-letter acronyms.

First, there are Customer Relationship Management (CRM) systems, which are very effective solutions for storing transactional data but don’t necessarily offer insight into anonymous user behavior prior to a transaction taking place.

Next, there are Data Management Platforms (DMPs), which are largely used to collate and analyse anonymous website interactions and create audience segments to feed digital advertising technologies.

While these are both valuable tools in their own right, they don’t always integrate effectively with other systems used throughout the rest of the user experience.

The latest entrant to the data management market is the Customer Data Platform (CDP). They can be used effectively alongside both CRM systems and DMPs, meaning businesses don’t need to completely replace their tech stack.

CDPs bridge multiple sources of first-party data such as online and offline transactions, interactions on connected devices and conversations with call centers. They create a clean, centralized data foundation that delivers a single view of the customer which is accessible across the entire business.

Because data sources are unified to form a single view of the customer across all devices and channels, and because business rules can be set centrally to be applied across the organisation, CDPs help businesses establish a robust and transparent data supply chain to underpin governance and comply with local data regulations.

Final thoughts on the data privacy landscape

The data privacy landscape will continue to evolve, and people will always try to predict what future regulations will look like, but that’s not where businesses should focus their attention.

By taking a fully transparent, privacy-first approach to data management, businesses will be empowered to build valuable, long-lasting consumer relationships whatever shape future data regulations may take.

Catherine is Regional Vice President APJ Solutions for Tealium. She has spent 25 years in IT, marketing and digital development, specifically working with the data that drives these tools. Previously, Catherine held a number of regional roles with multinational organizations such as Oracle, IBM, Acxiom, Marketo, and as an independent digital consultant.

The post The shape of future data privacy regulation is immaterial appeared first on ClickZ.

Reblogged 11 hours ago from www.clickz.com

What you can do.

We’re pressing pause on our normally scheduled programming to shift our focus to what’s incredibly important right now, tomorrow, and forever. The incredible injustice and inequality experienced in the black community continues to be one of the most startling evils of society and it’s up to us to …

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Reblogged 14 hours ago from www.acquiremag.com

This Rare Gautier Cognac From 1792 Set a Record at Auction

While we’re generally reaching for a strong bottle of barrel-aged whiskey whenever we want to make a cocktail, there’s a case to be made that you should be making your whiskey cocktails with cognac. Cognac,…

Reblogged 14 hours ago from coolmaterial.com

Charting your brand’s response to COVID-19 through the lens of history

30-second summary:

  • History shows us that it is in a brand’s best interest to continue to advertise through an economic downturn. This is supported by research conducted in the wake of past recessions and the 9/11 crisis.
  • Two new studies specific to the COVID-19 crisis—one by the 4A’s, the other by GlobalWebIndex (GWI)—reinforce the importance of continuing to advertise.
  • Beth Egan, an associate professor in advertising media planning strategy at Syracuse University’s S.I Newhouse School of Public Communications, and the Mower Insight Group look through the lens of history to identify three critical actions for marketers navigating uncharted waters: invest for the future health of their brand; find a brand voice that resonates now; and apply spend according to shifting media habits.

While the country focuses on how to stop the spread of COVID-19 and stem the economic downfall caused by its disruption, marketers must also determine how to react in the short term to minimize long-term damage as they adapt to the new normal.

If they are to prevail, companies must be prepared to serve their customers both now and when the pandemic subsides. It’s a formidable challenge, to be sure, since the current crisis is unlike anything we have had to navigate before, but there is some precedent in past events—from major recessions to the terrorist attacks of 9/11—that can help inform our actions moving forward.

Drawing lessons from previous crises and examining what we have already learned from the COVID-19 threat, answers emerge for three critical areas of concern:

  • Investing for the future: Organizations that continue to support a level of marketing spending during the crisis will be better positioned to maintain long-term brand health.
  • Finding a brand voice: Marketers must find a message and tone for their brand/category that resonates with what people are experiencing right now.
  • Accounting for shifting media habits: Media habits have shifted as the majority of Americans stay home, so organizations need to adjust spend accordingly.

Investing for future brand health

History shows us that it is in a brand’s best interest to continue to advertise through an economic downturn. In particular:

  • Increasing advertising spending during a recession has a positive impact on both ROI and market share. A 1999 study by J. Walter Thompson’s Steven King of 300 companies that had navigated a recession revealed that those that substantially increased their advertising during the downturn saw 2.7% increases in ROI on their marketing spending and market share gains of 0.5% to 0.9%. These findings have proven consistent through later recessions.
  • In a sign that King’s advice continues to resonate, research by Dentsu Aegis Group during the COVID-19 pandemic found that while 47% of Chinese agencies said their business was impacted by the crisis, only 7% stopped spending on advertising completely.
  • A consumer packaged goods brand that stops advertising loses half of its brand awareness in just 2.5 weeks, according to research by Simon Broadbent in the late 1970s.
  • Consumers respond positively to advertising in times of crisis, with the exception of messaging that they perceive to exploit the situation for commercial gain, according to a post-9/11 study from Hofstra and Pace universities.
  • A pair of studies conducted during the COVID-19 crisis reveal two hopeful facts for marketers: 1) consumers still want to hear from brands; and 2) more Americans than not believe advertisers should carry on as normal (more on these later).

New research specific to the coronavirus crisis also supports the importance of continuing to advertise. The 4A’s polled 1,000 consumers this March, 43% of whom said, “It is reassuring to hear from the brands I know and trust.”

Another March study, this one by GlobalWebIndex (GWI), revealed that 38% of Americans believe that advertisers should carry on as normal during the pandemic, compared to 28% who do not.

While there are no studies of what it costs businesses that “go dark” in a downturn to rebound once the recession is over, recency theory suggests that the spend required to rebuild awareness could negate any savings gained by pulling back.

Also, brands that continue to invest in advertising while others cut back have the opportunity to capture a higher share of voice at lower media cost.

Finding your brand voice

A consumer-centric approach to marketing strategy is nothing new, but amid a crisis, understanding your customers’ mindsets becomes even more important than understanding their wants and needs.

Your messaging during COVID-19 needs to take into account changes in consumer behavior that will likely continue as long as the threat of the pandemic exists.

It needs to set the right tone and communicate something meaningful and relevant to what people are experiencing now. And there’s more to messaging than what your brand is saying. Now more than ever, it’s just as important is you’re doing.

Today’s consumers—driven by the priorities of millennials and Generation Z—increasingly consider a brand’s stance on societal issues when making their purchasing decisions.

They are paying close attention to brands’ actions during the pandemic and quickly reacting, through social media shaming, boycotts and other means, to those they perceive to be taking advantage of the crisis.

The good news is that consumers are open to hearing a variety of messages from brands during a crisis.

The post-9/11 research by Hofstra and Pace universities identified four key messaging formats that emerged in the wake of the attack and measured consumers’ responses to examples of each:

  • Designed to show a human face of the organization.
  • Designed to encourage political or community participation.
  • Congratulating individuals or groups for patriotic achievement.
  • Designed to exploit the event for commercial gain.

Of these, only the commercial ads received a more negative than positive response (45%) while two-thirds of respondents reacted positively to the image-related, participatory and patriotic messages.

The Hofstra and Pace researchers drew from the work of social psychologists Sherif and Sherif to explain why these themes triggered positive responses.

The answer lies in four behavioral changes the psychologists identified that take place when a group encounters an outside threat: increased group cohesiveness, rise in autocratic leadership, focus on activities, and emphasis on loyalty.

Of these, image and patriotic ads convey a “we’re in this together” message that resonates in the context of increased group cohesiveness while messages that encourage participation speak to a focus on activities.

Spend to shifting media habits

Everyday routines have been drastically altered as Americans largely ride out the COVID-19 crisis at home. Two recent studies look at the impact of stay-at-home orders on media consumption habits, providing valuable intel to marketers considering where to direct their advertising dollars.

The first, by Nielsen, predicts Americans will consume 60% more content during the pandemic. This is based on consumers’ media habits during two disruptive natural events: the 2016 New York blizzard dubbed “Snowpocalypse” and the catastrophic Hurricane Harvey that made landfall in Texas a year later).

GWI’s COVID-19 research, meanwhile, shows that 95% of Americans are spending more time using in-home media. Video, combining both digital and linear, is seeing the highest increases.

Social channels have also significantly increase, serving as a news source and a way to easily connect with family and friends, while cinema and outdoor advertising have substantially declined.

Radio consumption has predictably dropped in in-car listenership, but surprisingly, in-home usage is up 26% with people listening in on their smartphones (19%), laptops (12%) and smart speakers (10%).

The road to opportunity

There’s no question that COVID-19 has dramatically disrupted business as usual and its effects will reverberate for the foreseeable future.

For certain industries—hygiene and cleaning products, for instance, as well as groceries, food delivery, ecommerce, online learning, and work-from-home tools—the pandemic has created growth opportunities that would have been unthinkable just a few months ago, leaving them struggling to keep up with demand.

For too many others—like travel, live sports and entertainment venues, fashion and retail, transportation—safety concerns and stay-at-home orders have caused precipitous drops. As the crisis continues, existing models support a minimum GDP decline of 5%.

The lessons of history point to three critical steps for marketers today. Whether COVID-19 has brought growth or decline to their industry, they must continue to invest in marketing at some level to ensure their brand’s long-term health.

They need to understand what their customers are experiencing and find a message that will resonate with them now. And to reach their audiences with that message, they must allocate more of their marketing budget to the social media and video channels consumers are tuning into while they spend more time at home.

The challenges of marketing in a pandemic environment will be with us for some time. But with a clear path forward, informed by past crises and early intelligence from COVID-19, they are not insurmountable.

For a deeper dive into the studies and insights presented in this article, read the white paper by Egan and Mower Insight Group, Lessons From History: How Brands Should Respond During the COVID-19 Crisis.

The post Charting your brand’s response to COVID-19 through the lens of history appeared first on ClickZ.

Reblogged 1 day ago from www.clickz.com

It’s time to re-evaluate your marketing automation stack

30-second summary:

  • Right now, companies have a critical opportunity to re-evaluate if their marketing automation stacks can keep up with their unique needs while keeping business growth in focus.
  • If your current marketing automation platform doesn’t seamlessly integrate with your other business technologies, it’s time to look for a platform that does.
  • Companies must look for flexible tools that incorporate contact management and also go beyond lead generation to impact the complete customer lifecycle.
  • You want a core platform that is not only focused on one point of the buyers’ journey, but also one that is more expansive and will help maximize your sales funnel, run with your key systems and make sure leads are being nurtured.
  • You need to understand how your investment in a platform will help you grow and deliver ROI. Be sure that you’re clear on pricing structure, contract terms and SLAs, or Service Level Agreements.

The world is moving fast and things are changing every day. With many companies cutting budgets and adjusting their business models to function in the current pandemic, it’s more important than ever to make customers feel supported while being smart with time and resources. The best way to do that is to ensure you have the best tools and vendors to back your unique needs and keep business growth in focus during these unpredictable times. Right now, companies have a critical opportunity to re-evaluate if their marketing automation stacks can keep up with their unique needs while keeping business growth in focus.

It’s also an important time to maintain a clear company road-map for the future, not just the next few months, and determine if your current marketing tools will grow your business today as well as five years down the road.

Here’s how you can take an effective look now at what platforms will help your company weather a crisis and protect your growth.

Knowing when it’s time to switch your marketing automation stack

Many companies miss the warning signs that it is time to re-evaluate their stack, and they find themselves locked into vendor contracts for longer than they should.

Here’s one of the biggest red flags: If your current marketing automation platform doesn’t seamlessly integrate with your other business technologies, it’s time to look for a platform that does.

In today’s world, technology is open. Businesses are more quickly adopting the newest and best automation tools to maximize all aspects of their operations. However, in order to unlock the full potential of these new and advanced technologies, they must interact efficiently.

Marketing automation platforms can help you learn as much about your current customers as they do about prospective customers.

Platforms that help increase growth, but don’t integrate well with your existing CRMs, social media marketing solutions or account-based marketing solutions, make it harder to move the needle towards your goals.

Companies must look for flexible tools that incorporate contact management and also go beyond lead generation to impact the complete customer lifecycle.

Effective growth happens when integrated stacks simultaneously attract new customers and enhance existing relationships, delivering great experiences at every customer touchpoint.

This means that the full marketing team should be able to benefit from the best automated marketing platforms, from demand gen to customer marketing.

If a piece of your stack sits in a silo and only a few team members benefit from it, it is time to consider another option that can better holistically support your business.

What to consider in a new platform

When it’s time to look for a new marketing automation platform, there are many points to consider.

First, think of the key marketing road-map milestones you have over the next several years. Take into consideration that you’ll likely be using this platform for many years to come, and visualize the company’s unique needs not just in the coming months, but farther down the road.

You want a core platform that is not only focused on one point of the buyers’ journey, but also one that is more expansive and will help maximize your sales funnel, run with your key systems and make sure leads are being nurtured.

The platform must support your goal of creating a great customer experience that helps your brand stand out.

Beyond ensuring you have a platform that fits your company goals, get into the nitty-gritty details of a platform’s pricing model while you research.

You need to understand how your investment in a platform will help you grow and deliver ROI. Be sure that you’re clear on pricing structure, contract terms and SLAs, or Service Level Agreements.

Many expensive pricing structures are based on database size, and because much of your database is often unreachable, you’re stuck shelling out for information that’s not benefiting your bottom line.

Instead, look for models that are more tied to value, like active contacts. Also, marketing automation is a long term process — so be skeptical of a contract that runs month to month.

The right marketing automation platform can help you take your marketing and business efforts to the next level and stay on top of shifting climates.

From controlling the shape and velocity of your funnel and pipeline, to gathering behavioral data of prospects and customers to increase engagement, it’s important for companies to look at platforms not just as marketing software but also as strong communication tools.

In a world where business moves quickly, budgets are tight and customer experience is more important than ever, be critical of your marketing automation platform – and don’t be afraid to make a change to better support your long-term growth strategy.

The post It’s time to re-evaluate your marketing automation stack appeared first on ClickZ.

Reblogged 1 day ago from www.clickz.com

Equip Your Kitchen with a Countertop Sausage Grill

Purpose-built to do sausages and brats the right way, Johnsonville’s Sizzling Sausage Grill takes the guesswork out of grilling to deliver mouthwatering results. With modular cooking plates for dogs, bratwurst, and even breakfast patties, this mess-free countertop cooker heats up to cook links and patties in under 10 minutes, and bigger brats in 15, all indoors, with automatic alerts when finished & quick, dishwasher-safe clean up.

Reblogged 1 day ago from www.werd.com

The EcoFlow R600 Serves Up Reliable Portable Power

The EcoFlow R600 Power Station is a portable power supply that delivers reliable, instant backup output—like a gas-powered generator in a smaller, more efficient, and cleaner package. One that’s also lightweight, maintenance free, and of course noise & emission-free. With power banks ranging from 288Wh up to 2304Wh, the system offers options for recreational, home, and emergency use. A funded Kickstarter.

Reblogged 1 day ago from www.werd.com

Ariana Grande, Tinashe and Several Other Celebrities Join Protests Against George Floyd's Death

Do Waist Trainers Actually Work?